Dress for Success: Marketing Yourself as a DJ

So you’ve spent years practicing your skills, you’ve got the tunes, and you think you’re ready to hit the big time.  No matter how talented you are, every DJ needs to carefully examine their marketing strategy in order to be successful.  Due to the increase in digital DJ technology, today there are more DJs than ever before.  It takes more than just good music and tunes to stand out in today’s music industry, and you’re going to have to carefully develop a solid marketing strategy in order to succeed.

What’s In a Name?

Choose your DJ name wisely; if you’re just starting out as a DJ, it’s a good idea to choose a great name right from the get-go.  If you’re not sure what your name should be, have a brainstorming session with your friends, and get creative.  Your best friend may come up with the perfect name for you!  While many well-known DJs go by their first and last names, other DJs prefer nicknames or names that have personal meaning to them.

Once you choose a name, do a google search to ensure that no one else has the same name.  You don’t want to run into any legal issues when you’re just beginning a new career.  Make sure your name is relatively easy to pronounce and spell.  The more complicated you make it, the more the likelihood that a promoter will mis-spell your name on a flyer or an emcee will incorrectly announce it on the mic.

Creating a Logo

These days, many of the most successful DJs have branded themselves with great logos that are synonymous with their names.  Unless you’re a multi-talent and a vector graphics wizard, you should consider hiring a professional graphic designer.  Your logo should inspire trust, admiration and loyalty, and be instantly and uniquely recognizable.


While it might cost a little to hire a professional designer, a logo is an investment that you will be able to use for many, many years to come.  You’re going to be using it on all your mixtape covers, tshirts, stickers, website, and business cards, so it’s a good idea to have it done right the first time. Logos really make a DJ stand out from the rest on flyers and give you the professional edge that many promoters are looking for.

We actually wrote an older full article on chosing a DJ name and DJ logo back in 2009!

Picture Perfect

Dada Life Promo Photo

You’re going to need some amazing photos to use to promote yourself as a DJ.  This is where having a great creative team really comes in handy.  First of all, you’ve got to choose how you’d like to present yourself to the industry, in terms of personal style.  Take your time to carefully consider how you would like to be perceived, and make sure that the images you choose complement your musical style.  It’s helpful to begin to build relationships with local designers and stores at this point in time.  Think of ways you can be creative, and help to cross-promote each other on your online media and/or at shows.

Once you’ve got your look down pat, practice posing behind your decks (or with your Midi Fighter), and then search for a good photographer in your area.  Before the photoshoot, send them a few reference photos that you like, so you’re both on the same page about the final result that you’d like to achieve.  Make sure to bring some tunes that you like to the shoot, to keep the energy high on set.  Have the photographer (or a photo editor) edit the photos afterwards to make them shine even more.

Why invest in photos? Because if you want the club to make you the headliner, you will need some photos to go on the flyer! Imagine this:

  • Club: Hey DJ Spin Steady,  we want you to headline our new club “Crunk”! All I need is a hi-res photo for our flyer by end of day.
  • DJ: Ummmmm.. I dont have any photos, will my facebook profile shot work?

This is a super bad look! You should always have a great photo that is perfect for flyers- as well as a website and bio ready to go.

Strong and Steady Wins the Race

Now that you’ve got your logo designed, and photos edited, you’re ready to build and create your promotional materials; including mixtape and track covers, PDFs and business cards. Before you have any media designed, consider your target market, (ie. fans) and think about the imagery that is likely to attract their attention. Consistent promotional materials that use the same color scheme, and branding helps to develop a familiarity between you and your fan base, and will make you appear more professional and organized to the industry.  (Hopefully, resulting in landing more gigs!)  Bring your promotional materials out on a consistent basis to the world and watch your rep grow bigger.

In addition, you should consider building an electronic press kit with all of your materials in it!

 Dressing the Part

When you perform, your audience will want to see you looking similar to the way you appeared in your promo pics. Keep this in mind when you select your outfit for your performances ; if you show up looking drastically different than you appear in your photos, you may confuse (or disappoint) your audience.  (Unless, of course, you’re like Lord Finesse and you ‘come with more styles than fashion designers’)  Clothes don’t necessarily ‘make the man’ but they sure are a good start!

As annoying as it might sound to have a “outfit” keep in mind that people need memorable things to grab onto that make an artist memorable. This could be your hair, clothes, a performance routine or anything really that makes you special. The point is to keep it consistent, even after you are bored to tears with the flaming turntable trick the audience will still eat it up.

Mind Your Media

Social Media is an incredibly important way to promote yourself as a DJ and artist.  The best news is, there are a wide variety of tools that are free and easy to get started with.  At the very least, you should have a Facebook Page, a Twitter Account and a blog that you use to regularly communicate with your fans.  Aim to use your social media to inspire and engage people.  Post up regular news about your new tunes, shows, photos, videos and interesting facts about you that fans may enjoy.  There are millions of musicians and DJs nowdays – give people a good reason to love you!

 

One of the main things a club is going to ask is, “how popular is this DJ?” Well, thanks to social media you can actually have a real answer backed up with some serious marketing firepower. By building your social media base, a new DJ is also building their most valuable asset: a reliable way to pull in fans.

Good websites that will help you to market yourself online include:  Topspin, Next Big Sound, and ReverbNation.

Make it Big In the Biz

Get yourself some DJ cards printed and carry them with you all the time.  When you meet new contacts, be polite, and professional, and give them your business card.  If promoters like you personally, (and you’re able to fill up their venue) opportunities will be presented to you.  Think of ways you can help to advertise yourself at shows; maybe it’s as a simple as a laptop sticker or wearing a tshirt with your logo on it, or perhaps you have a few ingenious promotional ideas up your sleeve!

If you play your cards right and put some thought into your marketing plan, you can turn what you love to do into a fulfilling career.

A note from the editorial desk: long-time DJ TechTools readers will recall that we’ve covered more other elements of promotion in the past. For a refresher, peruse the links below! 

Self Promotion Tools for DJs
Self Promotion for Working DJs

  • moxie

    Geez! What’s up with all the put downs here? The author is trying to offer up some constructive advice about marketing your business as a DJ! The dweebs that are so quick to criticize obviously haven’t made it using their own methods…So, If you don’t like what you read, shut up and move on!

  • Pingback: Dress for Success: Marketing Yourself as a DJ | Dj Klint()

  • A cut above

    I thought of becoming a DJ, but after reading this forum, it is apparent that it is not the business I want to get into. Some of the writers need to clean up their “potty mouths”

  • 11_love

    Great Tips for pros and beginners.

  •  I find the article above has nothing wrong from the marketing point of view. But, I noticed some commentators are not in favor. Maybe because they are not in-syic, lol. Whatever is it, I think it just an art of selling self as a dj. Good/bad, pretty/ugly, tall/short, etc, all for 1 purpose, to reach out awareness. All these are extras. Main thing is the quality of music. A DJ’s job is to play good music, nothing else. Anything which is good found on them (looks, skills, creativity) gain additional points. But then, it’s up to the audience. Different people, different view and as long it does not go  out of tune from the topic. What I can say is that to promote self, first there are many basic and common things or knowledge must be in hand, followed by music instruments or skill and knowledge. The first part is to do something that will make ownself to look normal and tidy. Communication skill  is added advantage. When on stage, it is show time. Best is when got the ‘look’ for maximum effect like david beckham if he’s a dj. Maintain good skills and tastes while playing records. Until here, I think it is sufficient enough to equipped with necessary knowledge to be a decent dj. The rest is up to the club manager. Most importantly, one must know that being a dj is more easier with all the mistakes are mostly done when nobody sees it. Spinning on stage in front of people will be perfect with no mistakes because that’s the trick. But if you find a dj that make stupid mistakes, then that time you are a dj. Good luck.

  • This is a great article. When it comes to Social Media I love what Rootmusic is doing with Bandpage and how they have integrated Soundcloud, ArtistData, and now Topspin. Your Facebook Fan Page can have one tab that has all your promo materials, tour dates, and store for merchandise and tickets. I made some tutorial videos showing you how to DIY. http://bit.ly/bpsuccess

  • Flim

     i agreed with you buttonfreak.  to try and make the image in djing is big GAY GAY !! 
     play a killer set !!  make people happy , because try to copy with image like big name dj not going to work ,  they done it before you and they did it better than you. sometimes with dj headshot is a big turn off.  music is art not model

  • FUCK OFF

  • FUCK OFF

  • This article does NOT tell DJs to dress up or like a “douchebag” or “seductive model.” I’m wondering if the people hating on this article even took the time to read it thoroughly. This article encourages DJs to develop their OWN personal style and market it. Anyone who understands business and marketing will tell you the same thing. You can’t just make it by creating tracks and mixes because (at the very least) you need a strategy for marketing those mixes.This is a well-written article that offers great advice. Please ignore the haters.

  • Anonymous

    Interesting. I didn’t read the comments when I posted, now I have “caught up”.

    Hmm…getting popular without really marketing yourself. I’d say, in todays “viral” world connected by the internet, it could be possible, at least to some extent. Look at the many Youtube hits like Keenan Cahill and The Annoying Orange. Neither of them were out to become popular I am sure. They just wanted to have fun and did and people had fun with them.

    Isn’t that what DJing is all about too?

    But then, they did do marketing after the fact, to make a profit from the fun, the talent and their work (or play).:)

    So bottom line is, you can become popular without marketing, but you won’t live long without it.

    scamo

  • Jrockin629

    what this to the end… think this will help (or fuel the petty debate). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNMp1aen-Ng&feature=feedu

  • Quenepas

    Dressing the part with a pic of Iron Man? Aint that a bit overdressed? 

    • Quenepas

      A pic or Ironman? Maybe it is too “METAL” for some people… YEEEEEEEEEEEEAHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA……

  • Guy

    LOL

  • Mick-h

    The power of the internet if u manage it…and producing the meanest stonking tracks…will draw attention…will come to you like the pied piper….pick a freeky name hide under a hat..sit in your studio and smoke and drink coke….be shy if u want..or not
    and produce quality music…dress how u want…wer  not clones

    do you think deadmau5 has business cards ? 

    • Mistermr

      Not now, but he probably did originally, either that or he got lucky.

    • Mistermr

      Not now, but he probably did originally, either that or he got lucky.

    • Mistermr

      Not now, but he probably did originally, either that or he got lucky.

  • Fergus Waveforms

    I read somewhere on another forum “dress at least as sharp as your audience”.

    Who are you going to play to? You should put the same kind of effort into your apperance as the crowd you are going to be in front of.

    Even if you are a rotund man with a beard and a stained tshirt, that is your image and it is part of your identity as a DJ. If you are playing at a corporate function, dress sharp, if you are spinning at a costume party wear a costume.

    As any kind of performer thinking about your image and how you present yourself is essential.

  • Fergus Waveforms

    Read some

  • Fergus Waveforms

    Read some

  • Great article sara, and I love the pic at the top.

  • Great article sara, and I love the pic at the top.

  • TheNonWho

    Big Tipp by me (ok its obviouse…): be inspiring and funny at the same time while keeping it seroius… obviouse but hard to learn…
    e.g. (DJ) Shiftee

  • The writing is not terrible, but anyway you slice it, discussions of marketing can make one sick in the stomach. HOWEVER, the first picture is so STUPID looking I was turned off from the get go. Not very good marketing. Looks more like an add for clothes at Target.

  • The writing is not terrible, but anyway you slice it, discussions of marketing can make one sick in the stomach. HOWEVER, the first picture is so STUPID looking I was turned off from the get go. Not very good marketing. Looks more like an add for clothes at Target.

    • looks like he’s about to stick his finger in his ass too.

  • The writing is not terrible, but anyway you slice it, discussions of marketing can make one sick in the stomach. HOWEVER, the first picture is so STUPID looking I was turned off from the get go. Not very good marketing. Looks more like an add for clothes at Target.

  • Mick-h

    Haha sounds like running a business university style…. i dont even know what 99% of the djs look like when buying and playing ther tunes( Deadmau5!)..unless ive seen them live..( and u wouldnt go see them live unless hearing first)….
    1/ hear track/radio session and like
    2/search for name
    3/grab tunes and play and like
    4/go to live event to see the producer/dj(if they play live and local)
    never notice what they dress like..(unless its a giant mouse head) 

    dress how u want… how u picked..like your music..like you!!
    dont try clone our world!

    • Mistermr

      You might want to try reading the article again lol

  • DJ AJ

    damn so much hate… while it doesn’t say dress like a douche…. u do get an idea that u gotta have your style…. be original…. n no don’t dress like a douche to fit in… be you do you…. 

  • dsyben

    A lot of the comments below are pretty ignorant. All of the artists that are used as examples below, Diplo, Skream, Benga, Switch etc all do this.

    The article is more of a taking the next step type of thing, not how to get your first gig, but it is incredibly relevant.

    For those who mention production as the way to make your name, record labels look at all of this shit too! They need to sell your music and you need to be marketable.

    The article is not sugesting you do a David Guetta, it is saying DO WHAT IS RELEVANT TO YOUR SCENE AND YOUR AUDIENCE.

    I imagine most of the people mocking this don’t and probably never will get booked to play outside of their own town.

  • dsyben

    A lot of the comments below are pretty ignorant. All of the artists that are used as examples below, Diplo, Skream, Benga, Switch etc all do this.

    The article is more of a taking the next step type of thing, not how to get your first gig, but it is incredibly relevant.

    For those who mention production as the way to make your name, record labels look at all of this shit too! They need to sell your music and you need to be marketable.

    The article is not sugesting you do a David Guetta, it is saying DO WHAT IS RELEVANT TO YOUR SCENE AND YOUR AUDIENCE.

    I imagine most of the people mocking this don’t and probably never will get booked to play outside of their own town.

  • dsyben

    A lot of the comments below are pretty ignorant. All of the artists that are used as examples below, Diplo, Skream, Benga, Switch etc all do this.

    The article is more of a taking the next step type of thing, not how to get your first gig, but it is incredibly relevant.

    For those who mention production as the way to make your name, record labels look at all of this shit too! They need to sell your music and you need to be marketable.

    The article is not sugesting you do a David Guetta, it is saying DO WHAT IS RELEVANT TO YOUR SCENE AND YOUR AUDIENCE.

    I imagine most of the people mocking this don’t and probably never will get booked to play outside of their own town.

  • davver

    I really think that people who self promote are mostly in for the money, not the music. and that means that if they become famous, they’ll probably just end up like guetta.

  • Lauti

    feed the soul, starve the ego

    • Zac Kyoti

      Hell yeah.

    • Zac Kyoti

      Hell yeah.

  • Kovacs

    Is clear that marketing and promotion help the Dj to move around and get gigs, you can be the best Dj in the world but if you dont get out of your bedroom nobody will know it.

    Now, the really important fact about djing is: if you arent good at producing, playing and performing, you can be dressed as Madonna that you wont get any gigs. 

  • People, people, please… stop.

    The article is _GENERAL ADVICE_. Any artist of any kind who wants to get paid to “play out” will have to conform to the notions of their customers. People who will pay you money to play have expectations (stated or unstated) that you have to meet.

    What you have to do is figure out for yourself how to apply these bits of advice for your specific case.  Simple to state, not necessarily simple to implement. 

    While the example of the article shows DJs y’all want to hate on, the advice isn’t negated by the fact that club owners (in particular) like to see you as a _business person_ who has made making music their business. Having an electronic press kit, good photos, samples of your work, etc. are all part of that game. Either get in the game or be left out of the game…

    Whether you think the example DJ in this article is a douche or not is irrelevant to the facts laid out in the article. All of the advice holds true no matter where you are on the DJ hierarchy. Ragging on about the example DJ adds NOTHING to the discussion.
     

  • ironstylus

    This all depends on what kind of dj you want to be, the type known for making/playing sick music that a fanbase of genuine music lovers will follow or a brand name dj that doesnt mind a little bit of whoring/selling out to get bigger.
    each to their own but i cant help but think of pauly d when i read this article…

    • I think it’s possible to be a great DJ, and at the same time, build a successful brand for yourself and your music.  Two exceptional DJs who have achieved this are Richie Hawtin and DJ QBert.  Musically, they are both forces to be reckoned with, and have developed strong, authentic brands for themselves.

      • Ironstylus

        Of course you will always find a few exceptions but Qbert was able to create his brand because he has almost always been streets ahead of the competition, you would be hard pressed to find anyone who honestly thinks he is not the best scratch dj skill-wise, these djs created a brand through genuine hard work and over years of earning the respect they command, not by wearing G-star raw jeans and doing a few moody black and white photo shoots.
        Re-reading the article i feel i may have been a little harsh with the Pauly D comparison, i was just a bit agitated when i read it lol

  • Djjackmeoff

    Besides those cool white parties you see in Amsterdam and ultra lavish clubs most raves and events have some of the ugliest and worse dress people I have ever seen. Telling the EDM scene how to dress or act is a big no-no. I wanna say 80% of them hate anything mainstream and really hate/avoid those lavish clubs with dress codes. From a business stand point…if you’re a mediocre dj and just want to playout, you might have to play along and put on the monkey suit and market yourself. If you have talent and are you unique no one gives a shit.

    • Joel

      LOL your completely lost. Is that seriously the name you try to get gigs with? Personally organized tons of parties underground and over and i would never put a name like that on a flyer. Its people like you that need to read this, it could really help you lot.

  • Anonymous

    Nice article and cool pics.:)

    http://www.sarasimms.com/?page_id=384

    scamo

  • Anonymous

    Nice article and cool pics.:)

    http://www.sarasimms.com/?page_id=384

    scamo

  • Anonymous

    Nice article and cool pics.:)

    http://www.sarasimms.com/?page_id=384

    scamo

  • it’s certainly a fine line between having a professional dj package and looking like manufactured artist with no soul. Personally, I think you can have the best of both worlds. 

    #1- be yourself, dont oversell or try to manufacture an image that is not real. 

    #2- still have clean photos, a solid website and a professional presentation 

    I think bass nectar is a good example. Lots of authentic raw soul there, but he has also built a solid brand around him that conveys: I take my music seriously. 

    • Quenepas

      He reminds me of Cousin Itt lol nice guy thou!

    • thebuttonfreak

      I can get down with this statement. 

    • Ean has made a good point.  First and foremost, it’s always important to be yourself, and make sure you present yourself and your music to the world in a manner that you’re comfortable with, and that you feel best represents you.

  • Choonage

    This article is horrid. Its people like this that give DJ’s a douch rep. Your promo pic is disgusting, we already know you are a DJ.. we dont need pictures of you around gear not plugged in with your headphones on. Funny that the author of this articles claim to fame is a gig at a jeans store in a mall. 

  • Manwolf

    …this article is VERY relevant to all types of DJs. You know the band GWAR? They come out in crazy costumes and chop people’s heads off, spraying the crowd with fake blood and green slime. Imagine if they came out in their street clothes and just “phoned it in”. What if your favorite football team came out in sweats instead of their uniforms? It’s all part of the SHOW. If you want to be a bedroom, opening DJ for the rest of your life, disregard this article. You don’t have to wear a douchbag leather jacket and a V-neck hipster undershirt. But look the part, whatever it is.

  • Tito

    What an article, maybe the worst of all. Djcosmotools has arrived. The truth is the most new dj´s i known, can spend months in how they look, their dj name, even their attitude before have a gig, and defend the digital option (Obviously) . I think the second part of this article should be how to wear all day your headphones around the neck, How to wave your hands and pretend to do something in the mixer and get the right angle for the photo.
    The point is if someone buy a book of “How to make friends” never will make any because do not get the point. Same on dj, football player, movie director, etc.
    Luckily it is not that easy, you can have all the gadgets, all the clothes, fanpages, but to really enjoy this job and been here for a long time it takes something else that there is no recipe.

  • Alex Vickers

    One thing to remember: who you know has more of a bearing on your success than ANY of this. You won’t get any gigs if you don’t put yourself out there at a club you want to play at and get in with the promoters.

  • howwedo

    People hating on this article will continue getting gigs at their local bars and bowling alleys – this stuff is crucial if you want to have success in LA, Vegas, etc.

  • Thetastates

    this article tells the sad pathetic truth of the club industry.   If you’re a guy you have to look like a douchebag.  If you’re a woman you have to look like a seductive model that the audience can potentially have sex with.

  • Thetastates

    this article tells the sad pathetic truth of the club industry.   If you’re a guy you have to look like a douchebag.  If you’re a woman you have to look like a seductive model that the audience can potentially have sex with.

  • Traktorscratchpro

    without even reading more than the 1st paragraph, i find there’s absolutely nothing worse than when a dj who has absolutely no experience already tries to find their dj name. it’s lame.

  • Kay Playa

    The people who think this article is irrelevant to the success of a DJs career are those that have no concept of BUSINESS. Even if you think the only way to make it as a DJ these days is by using production as a tool, don’t you realize you STILL have to market your production? If you don’t care to market yourself, whether or not your skills are top notch you will always be second rate to someone who does effectively market themselves.
    Now musically or personally is one thing, but how can you NOT want to be like David Guetta or Skrillex when they’re traveling the world DJing different places on a consistent basis? You may not want to be like them, but I bet you want your gig calendar to look like theirs!

    • DJHH

      I like people like Diplo, Skream, Benga, Switch, etc. who ARE travelling around the world on constant basis and still they dont make shitty music and theie image and management is “only” a big plus but not the MAIN thing that makes them famous. Understand?

      • Hola !

        its funny u mentioned Benga and Skream, since the visual presence of Magnetic Man is a key element of their live performance…

        • Kay Playa

          Thank You! The point is all things being equal, if you aren’t conscious of marketing yourself and I am, regardless of if you produce or do whatever, I will get more gigs than you. Truth be told the best promotion for a DJ is probably actually working!

      • thebuttonfreak

        Switch is the man and he’s one of the ugliest dudes out there. 

      • thebuttonfreak

        Switch is the man and he’s one of the ugliest dudes out there. 

  • Fred

    No wonder this article is horrible.. Sara Simms wrote it.

  • Dunks1980

    I do flyer design for a club and if a Dj hasn’t got a few professional shots even if they are “ugly and dress like shit” it makes it very difficult to make it not look like a locals dj night, so this article is pretty accurate.  

  • Johnny

    Cringe… Surely most promoters would actually avoid booking people if they saw some of this stuff. I know I would..

    Plus, I can see the value in record labels having a logo but is it really necessary for a DJ to have one? I can think of very few top-flight house DJ’s who bother having one, unless they’re putting out records as well.

    All this marketing stuff does my head in. I can see how it can bring success nowadays but that’s the problem. I love DJing and the culture but everyone’s getting too big for their boots these days. When my dad used to DJ the records were (quite rightly) the stars of the show and no-one really cared who played them. Obviously there’s a level of technical skill that goes in to DJing these days but now everyone thinks they need a logo and a marketing strategy because they’re stood there looping other people’s music in Traktor.

    As someone pointed out very few DJ’s break through these days without production. The only ones that I can think of that do (Jackmaster, Ben UFO) have been helped along by starting resepcted labels. And they don’t wear fancy clothes, have wacky hair or rely on cheesy ‘performance routines’. They stand there playing records very well and get involved in the scene at ground level. The cream will always rise to the top regardless…

  • JonnyBoy Dublin

    Why no mention of actually promoting yourself with some mixes? In this day and age you can easily stick a promo mix up so people can actually tell what your sound is like at the moment. Be sure to date them so people can tell exactly what your playing currently. Also if you want to go down the marketing route you could do up mixes specifically for promoters and label them as the time-slots your aiming for so ‘Warm-up’ if your aiming for an early slot etc.

    Or just go down the image is everything route…

    • Sara Simms

      This is a good suggestion for the DJs out there, thank you for mentioning this.

  • 303basslne

    fuck this shit. terrible article.

  • 303basslne

    fuck this shit. terrible article.

    • TheNonWho

      why?

  • It would be very convenient if you don’t only write “Topspin, Next Big Sound, and Reverbnation.” but rather hyperlink this sites directly. I mean “Topspin”, google that and enjoy results for ping-pong. 😉

    • Spacecamp

      It is done. : ) 

  • DJ Freeze

    image and appearance is everything – this is exactly how i got my latest and international following – djfreezeus.podomatic.com

    • Johnny

      What? Would you not prefer to think you got your ‘international following’ from being a good DJ and selector rather than what you look like?

  • John

    That’s bullshit. The only way to make it today is by making tracks.
    As a DJ only, you can just be successful localy.

    • dsyben

       Do you think it is super easy to sign tracks to DESCENT labels?

      Do you really think it is a walk in the park to make it as a producer?

      Do you honestly think record labels don’t consider any of this stuff when deciding whether or not to invest in you?

      If you answered YES to any of these… well, you get the picture.

      • Mick-h

        well this blows deadmau5 out the water…descent label? na he just made good tracks and played on the net

        walk in the park being a good producer?  yeah hide in your mancave playing with your studio gear..and playing on the net

        to invest in you”?….na they came knocking on his door

        you could be a ghost and just make good tracks and still be famous many others could say the same…. so i dont agree!

        • dsyben

           Interesting that you use one of the few exceptions to what most people go through to become known as a producer. If that’s what your waiting for bro, you could be there a while…

  • DJHH

    How to become David Guetta/Skrillex/Steve Angello kinda article.

  • Durf

    FYI graphic designers shouldn’t be using Photoshop to create logos, if they are, they’re doing something very wrong…

    • Nelson Ramalho

      Durf is right you would be better off learning a vector graphics editing software like Adobe Illustrator.

      Cool tip for DJs on a budget (like my self), if you can’t afford software to make your logo think again. Open Source Baby! Check out inkscape : http://inkscape.org/ . This is similar to Adobe Illustrator and is great for making logos and such as it’s a vector graphics program. If you still like photoshop also check out GIMP : http://www.gimp.org/

      I think this is a good article, its very tough to get noticed as a DJ and what ever helps you get noticed is worth the effort. Some DJs do go over board and look naff but trying to create an image for yourself isn’t a bad thing I think.

      Thanks for the article, nice light Friday read now back to some technical DJ tips next week! 😀

    • Spacecamp

      noted. we changed it to “vector graphics” wizard. more reasonable? 

    • Manwolf

      Photoshop rules! Illustrator can suck it. Vector graphics are for lames.

      • Durf

        You obviously have no idea what you’re talking about. Either you’re completely ignorant or trolling.

  • Dxtr

    A handy tip is to make sure you have a headshot and logo with a transparent background. Remove any background in Photoshop/whatever and save as a .PNG file. This will make it easier for graphic designers to place your artwork over backgrounds on flyers etc- might win you some points… 

    • Guest

      Hi Dxtr

      Just a note to say that while a .png file will be fine for web use (png stands for Portable Newtork Graphic) it won’t be suitable for print.  By definition it is low-res file format (72dpi) and will appear very pixellated on paper.  Also, you can’t take the background out of a .png file becasue the format does not support clipping paths or tranparencies.

      To be honest I would always supply a head shot or other photo as a full photo with the background in place then allow who ever is designing the flyer to take away your background if they feel it necessary.  That’s their job.

      If you are supplying photo images you’ll also need to think about the physical image size and the resolution it was taken at.  For example if your image is 300dpi and 150mm square, if the image is them enlarged to 30mm square to go onto a poster the resolution will drop to 75dpi and look pretty poor.  If you are using a pro photographer they will be able to take care of this for you.

      The best formats to supply photo files are photohop eps, or a good sized photoshop jpeg.

      The best way to supply a logo, such as the one above in the article, is as a vector file.  A vector file is created by drawing lines between points rather then creating an image made up of pixels (as a photo image is made up). This means that it doesn’t matter how big or small you make the logo, it will always be crisp across all media.  When you enlarge it you aren’t making the pixels bigger you are changing the distance between the points then telling the copmuter to connect the points.

      Hope this helps!

    • Guest

      Hi Dxtr

      Just a note to say that while a .png file will be fine for web use (png stands for Portable Newtork Graphic) it won’t be suitable for print.  By definition it is low-res file format (72dpi) and will appear very pixellated on paper.  Also, you can’t take the background out of a .png file becasue the format does not support clipping paths or tranparencies.

      To be honest I would always supply a head shot or other photo as a full photo with the background in place then allow who ever is designing the flyer to take away your background if they feel it necessary.  That’s their job.

      If you are supplying photo images you’ll also need to think about the physical image size and the resolution it was taken at.  For example if your image is 300dpi and 150mm square, if the image is them enlarged to 30mm square to go onto a poster the resolution will drop to 75dpi and look pretty poor.  If you are using a pro photographer they will be able to take care of this for you.

      The best formats to supply photo files are photohop eps, or a good sized photoshop jpeg.

      The best way to supply a logo, such as the one above in the article, is as a vector file.  A vector file is created by drawing lines between points rather then creating an image made up of pixels (as a photo image is made up). This means that it doesn’t matter how big or small you make the logo, it will always be crisp across all media.  When you enlarge it you aren’t making the pixels bigger you are changing the distance between the points then telling the copmuter to connect the points.

      Hope this helps!

  • are you trolling? you picked the worst examples ever.

  • thebuttonfreak

    All my favorite djs are ugly and dress like shit. This is a roadmap on how to be a douche.

    • DJ Otter

      +1  Have you ever seen Gridlok?  He looks like any other dude but when he plays people take notice.

      • Hola !

        i’m not sure anyone would call Gridlok famous…

        • well obviously, seeing as Anyone doesn’t even know who gridlok is..

      • Anyone

        Who the Fuck’s Gridlok?

    • Spacecamp

      Roadmap on how to be a douche: 
      Step one: Make a non-constructive comment on a website
      Step two: ????
      Step three: douchery

      • Ahsh

        Spacecamp… wanna stop shitting on peoples opinions??? Shred of Professionalism??? Maybe not tell people how to dress? douche

      • Jvl

        you forgot the step about using auto sync and not knowing how to dj at all looooool traktor n00b

        • really? Making that comment on a website full of traktor users that most likely sync and quantize their sets? You’re obviously not that bright..

          • Christian Iliescu

            Well you said “sync and quantize their sets” like quantization is a shame thing.Quantization does nothing special just saves for you a few seconds.5 years ago,i must be crazy

    • Quenepas

      You must be listening to Happy Hardcore or some obscure EDM then!! All my favorite Dj’s are beautifull!!

    • Quenepas

      You must be listening to Happy Hardcore or some obscure EDM then!! All my favorite Dj’s are beautifull!!

    • Borisboom

      I hate to say that I agree with you 😉 In some musical genre’s people don’t care what the DJ looks like. In very popular house music (which I personally hate) it sometimes looks like the DJ only has his clothing style going for him. A flux pavilion for example. His music is very popular nowadays. Luckily we like him for his music and not for his outlook.

      @spacecamp:disqus You probably get tired of people posting non-constructive comments all the time. But you can not deny that there is some very hard truth in what thebuttonfreak is saying.

    • Joel

      If you had to choose between two equally talented DJs for a show and one was ugly with no swag, which one would you choose? Talent should always come first but if you can’t get a gig because your presentation is messed up no one will no how good you are

    • Joel

      If you had to choose between two equally talented DJs for a show and one was ugly with no swag, which one would you choose? Talent should always come first but if you can’t get a gig because your presentation is messed up no one will no how good you are

    • Joel

      If you had to choose between two equally talented DJs for a show and one was ugly with no swag, which one would you choose? Talent should always come first but if you can’t get a gig because your presentation is messed up no one will no how good you are

    • His Holiness St. Pal

      agree…it’s ok to dress cool only if your OWN track are cool as well…but why you need to dress cool if you tracks are ? 🙂 no need at all 🙂