Point of no return

We have jumped far into the deep end of the digital pool. There is no lifeguard, no floaties on your arms and no grab holds in site. Time to figure out how to swim. Developing cool technology is the easy part, thats well under way. Figuring out how to use it in an artistic and emotionally compelling manner is another thing all together. Once that is complete then boom, all those nay-sayers will line up in droves. Until its complete digital djing or “controllerism” is just a term that loosely describes our direction not a cohesive creative movement.

While pondering these and other things I stumbled upon the following video in which Hank Shocklee (of public enemy) talks about that same hurdle in music production. He says: “You have to learn your basics, you have to learn how to dribble, you have to learn how to shoot a foul shot. Those are the things you have to learn and then once you’ve mastered your basics then you can get fly with them.”

What are the basics of digital djing? Well there are a lot but its hard to say what might best help you out. So I would like to take this opportunity to point out the feedback icon on the left that gives you the chance to tell Dj TT what your interested in learning. Those suggestions are what we look to first when inspiration is needed for a new article.


Interview: Hank Shocklee, Pt. I – On music making from cdm tv on Vimeo.

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Comments (10)
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  • Anonymous

    Hahaha, he can do loopeffects and freeze on his voice without software.

  • nico

    Finally got around to watch the video, and he makes a lot of good point. It's important to not loose touch with the big picture, and what I got from this is evident, yet worth repeating so we don't forget it: All this technology ultimately, you use it for only one reason, and that's conveying emotions.

    Or like the guy who taught me said: If you're not in it for the music, you're in it for the wrong reasons.

  • DJRio

    <blockquote cite="#comment-7812">I feel that this technology is able to do me things that I never did and never thought

    Thanks for sharing. I feel the same, and I'm starting to drift away from the comfortable limitations of Traktor into Ableton Live land where the possibilities are a huge, open space.

    Oh my friend, that is my next step, Ableton. For now I'm using Traktor and I feel very, very comfortable but in the near future I feel that I have to get my hands dirty with Ableton because I know Ableton is going to open me a new world.

    Thanks for your comments.

    Enjoy

    DJRio

  • Anonymous

    <blockquote cite="#comment-7812">I feel that this technology is able to do me things that I never did and never thought

    Thanks for sharing. I feel the same, and I'm starting to drift away from the comfortable limitations of Traktor into Ableton Live land where the possibilities are a huge, open space.

  • Anonymous

    <blockquote cite="#comment-7812">I feel that this technology is able to do me things that I never did and never thought

    Thanks for sharing. I feel the same, and I'm starting to drift away from Traktor into Ableton Live land where the possibilities are a huge, open space.

  • DJRio

    This is a great question, I have to say that my first approach to a DJ world was with vinyl, however that was when I was a teenager with some friend and we had the opportunity to make a disc play. From 4 years untill now I 've been working and trying to enter in the world of music and I discovered the controllerism and I never feel so comfortable and free to express my ideas that with my computer and my midi controller.

    Since I am a technology junky I feel very comfortable with my controller but is just like you feel with your gear, I have friends that prefer vinyl some others prefers CD the only things that I always said to them is with my controller I can make the same things that they do, but some times they can't make the things that I do with my controller and computer.

    We I touch for first time a couple of turntables I just only wanted to be a good DJ, that was when I was 15 years old, right now I have 35 years old I want to become a music producer, not only a DJ, because I feel that this technology is able to do me things that I never did and never thought.

    Enjoy friends and thanks.

    DJRio

  • BentoSan

    I really enjoyed this article too 🙂

    Don't forget to watch part 2 guys – http://www

  • nan

    I really liked the article and video. Last weekend I had a gig, so I was having some questions about how to set up to add some live instruments to my gig, using some other software… I went to visit a sound engineer, friend of mine, and when he saw my controller setup for mixing, his first reaction was to say that was f***ing plastic… Then we got into sort of the same subject as in the video, and I was glad I was able to make him see the big picture, which is not about doing the things you are allowed to do with this new technology, but it is how much bigger are the creative opportunities that it also empowers you to do. You draw the line in which the controllers allow you to do cool stuff, or you turn the controllers into a whole new platform to create, control and give shape to sounds, that will express and transmit a musical message.

  • resistance71

    he is very right about what he said.

    everybody has to have their own unique human element thats not just going to other motions but their own. djs, drummers, guitarists, etc., they all should have their unique flow with the right knowledge too.

    hank made some good points.

  • weaponry

    weaponry is first!!1!!1