The Value of a Name

As I am sure many of you know, DJ AM passed away this week. This article is not about his death, which has been covered in length elsewhere, but instead about his value to DJing and the under-appreciated value of a big name DJs to all of us.

ADAM WHO?

Many of you from around the world may only know about DJ AM because of his misfortunes or celebrity associations, so you’re probably wondering why we are writing about him. Well, Adam Goldstein (his real name) was a great DJ and totally dedicated to elevating his game technically and artistically.  An early adopter of the Serato Scratch system, he was instrumental in making it “cool” to bring a laptop into the club and in breaking down the stigmas around digital DJing in the mega-clubs of the states.  Thanks in part to his skills on the decks and exposure in the press most DJs in the states are now using computers in clubs.

Artistically, AM’s sets where composed of pop songs, but his fluid deconstruction of them was creative and terribly difficult to execute.  A hip-hop DJ for many years, he was devoted to the turntable craft, but fully embraced technology when it became available and did much to make it better. A special mode in Serato Scratch (where the names of tracks are hidden to protect them from trainspotters) was even named after him.

I first met Adam in 2004 while DJing a club, where I was banging away on my Oxygen 8  controller, and he came up to compliment me on a job well done.  He proudly showed me the Technics tatoo on his wrist as a way of saying, “hey, I love the craft of DJing too.”

MORE THAN A NAME

Sometimes we take for granted that there will always be people at the top of each field and that pop icons, music stars and high-profile DJs are easily created and replaceable by someone else. While there may be a long line of people trying to over take their positions, it takes much more than just circumstances to get to the top of anything — especially DJing. To achieve a “superstar status” and command $50,000 per gig is not a lucky press-related accident, but requires hard work, dedication and some real-world value. (Want to get there? This ongoing series can help.) Promoters are not stupid, and will not pay more money for a DJ than they can make back in exposure, ticket sales or both. Therefore the fame, skills, reputation and profile that a popular DJ creates not only benefit himself but also a huge group of people around him, whose businesses, jobs and lives are positively impacted by that DJ’s success.

A popular DJ’s value can go way beyond his or her nightly rate and is invaluable to the exposure they provide to the industry, fellow DJs and our work in general.  Even though he may not have invented the style, It was DJ AM’s talent and fame that helped make mash-up DJing a household name in the US market, creating a lucrative market for similar DJs around the world. His hard work and insane dedication to technical execution set a high bar for younger DJs trying to move up the ranks, which elevated the game musically.

The value of most artists at the top of their game cannot be conjured up out of thin air or easily replaced by the next person in line. It can only be created through hard work, dedication and a love for the craft. When someone like that is lost, everyone — including the craft — loses too.

Tips
Comments (50)
Add Comment
  • dj coast

    I’ll admit that before I had heard AM spin, I was hating on him a bit–the celebrity girlfriend, the stomach shrinking surgery, the general fatuousness of his (apparently) chosen crowd. Then I heard him play in NYC at a fairly small venue. Having spun for years, I can appreciate the technical skill of his set, serato notwithstanding. More importantly, however, was his command of a diverse range of music, from pop to hip hop to house, to things I never imagined being played and combined (Buddy Holly over DnB? sick!!). I recognized then that I was prone to the same prejudgment that I would condemn in others and managed to catch a few more of his sets, all of which were compelling. That’s the irony of it–he was a celeb dj, and yet he was bringing serious music architecture in terms of set structure and unlikely combinations, to a crowd that maybe showed up for his name, but ended up dancing to good music nonetheless. I can think of a dozen very hyped “underground” djs who have far more stret cred and couldn’t hang with AM in the most basic DJ skill–moving the crowd.
    RIP–DJ AM.

  • Sam

    [quote comment=”21286″]I do see where you are coming from anon, and I think this warrants another article entirely.

    Your right, just because a person is successful financially does not mean by default that their work is aesthetically meaningful. That is the artistic process inside each of us, that is very hard to teach. There are also many very talented people that get the art but fail in business.

    in today’s fast paced world if you want to stand out and do well in the arts I think its safe to say you need to be good at both.[/quote]
    [quote comment=””]It was only recently that I’d heard of DJ AM. The little that I’ve seen and read showed a guy that was genuinely grateful and humbled by his success.

    I read somewhere where he mentioned that pop music wasn’t necessarily his true love but rather his bread and butter;

    “The thing is, as a DJ, it’s not about me. If I’m [at Lollapalooza] I play all the hipster tracks because that’s what they want to hear. When I’m in Vegas, I play top 40 – I’m at work, I’m getting paid to be here. I’m not going to be, fuck you all, I’m playing electro all night when they want to hear Fergie. It’s about them. I’ll take the odd track to educate, but if I didn’t have that, I wouldn’t be able to pay my mortgage.”

    So whether you’re spinning the chicken dance at the VFW hall every weekend or “playing crappy pop songs to C-list celebrities and hollywood hipsters.”…you gotta eat.

    you can argue for and against his skills all day but don’t begrudge the guy for trying to make a buck.[/quote]

    Wow, Ean you are ridiculously diplomatic!

  • Mike

    Never heard of DJ AM untill I’ve seen a Travis Barker video with him last year. That DJ meets Drummer thing was fun and I liked all the live videos of their show. But other heads around the globe did this for a long time. They just didn’t have such a good and professional marketing.
    His solo DJ-sets never impressed me, even if they where allways pretty nice, compared to boring sets of some other DJs.
    Looks like he was bigger than I thought in the US, but Europeans didn’t really care about him. This is no haterism. We just didn’t know about this guy.
    Even if he’s none of my heroes, I think it’s a big lost to the DJ-world that he had to die.
    Nice article anyways and R.I.P. Adam.

  • Robb

    It was only recently that I’d heard of DJ AM. The little that I’ve seen and read showed a guy that was genuinely grateful and humbled by his success.

    I read somewhere where he mentioned that pop music wasn’t necessarily his true love but rather his bread and butter;

    “The thing is, as a DJ, it’s not about me. If I’m [at Lollapalooza] I play all the hipster tracks because that’s what they want to hear. When I’m in Vegas, I play top 40 – I’m at work, I’m getting paid to be here. I’m not going to be, fuck you all, I’m playing electro all night when they want to hear Fergie. It’s about them. I’ll take the odd track to educate, but if I didn’t have that, I wouldn’t be able to pay my mortgage.”

    So whether you’re spinning the chicken dance at the VFW hall every weekend or “playing crappy pop songs to C-list celebrities and hollywood hipsters.”…you gotta eat.

    you can argue for and against his skills all day but don’t begrudge the guy for trying to make a buck.

  • Ean Golden

    [quote comment=”21313″]A virtual funeral is no place to bicker[/quote]

    I agree- we all are on the same page now with AM and the MJ stuff is settled as that thread is now gone. So lets move on and let the guy rest in peace.

    thanks everyone for your thoughtful contributions to the conversation- it resulted in some good dialogue.

  • rerunner

    A virtual funeral is no place to bicker

  • duerr

    hahaha… I understand perfectly, you have a really bad sense of humour and a general lack of compassion for others. So understandably when people point out your faults your only response is ” it’s a harsh world bra- deal with it”. By the way it’s hard to get into my “big girl pants” when your mums still standing in them. JUST A JOKE MATE!

  • Ken

    [quote post=”2138″]duerr
    Sep 3rd, 2009 at 10:26 pm Quote

    OK, the MJ thread may have been in bad taste but it was very clearly labeled “MJ JOKES”. Some people find strip clubs offensive, but the ones that walk into strip clubs that are clearly labeled and whine are well…

    are you actually trying to rationalize why it’s okay to make fun of a man who was recently murdered. many of us found it offensive and insulting and fyi that goes against the forum’s rules. so maybe next time keep it to your poker game with the other muts.[/quote]

    Short answer yes! I am saying if you see something labeled as jokes about someone and your personal belief is we shouldn’t be joking its really as simple as not clicking on the link. Its called freedom of speech, if you don’t want to read or see things that you don’t like all you have to do is avoid it. Life has sharp corners, people will say and do things you don’t agree with it was like that before you and will stay like that long after your gone. When you can get both feet into your “big girl pants” maybe you’ll understand.

  • dj stylus

    i wish you jealous haters would let dj am rest in peace.
    drug addiction is a disease… he remained sober for 11 years..
    after the plane crash and death of friends he obviously had a lot of physical, personal and mental issues..post traumatic stress etc.
    he was a kind down to earth honorable human being..
    maybe he was too good and down to earth for all the hollywood bullshit..
    anyway…with dj am it was always ..” about the music “..
    and thats how i will remember him.
    when you can build up your dj skills, dj name, social circle, audience size, and bank account as large as dj am did….then you critisize..
    until then… stfu

  • ss714ss

    [quote comment=”21244″][quote comment=”21237″][quote comment=””]
    nothing to see here, move along.[/quote]
    You miss the point: He made a great contribution
    to the craft………Don’t be a hater Dawg![/quote]

    You missed the point: no, he didn’t. He played crappy pop songs to C-list celebrities and hollywood hipsters. There are plenty of amazing djs out there who actually have contributed to the art. DJ AM just wasn’t one of them.[/quote]

    tell me how he didn’t contribute to the art?

  • Ean Golden

    I do see where you are coming from anon, and I think this warrants another article entirely.

    Your right, just because a person is successful financially does not mean by default that their work is aesthetically meaningful. That is the artistic process inside each of us, that is very hard to teach. There are also many very talented people that get the art but fail in business.

    in today’s fast paced world if you want to stand out and do well in the arts I think its safe to say you need to be good at both.

  • DJLp

    True but she’s part of a great business machine. In turn, I do think AM was a great businessman.

  • anon

    A couple points of clarification:
    1) Anonymous and I are different people (wasn’t sure if that was clear or not.)
    2) I have no criticism of DJ AMs skills in promotion and business, I just don’t think that think that those skills have any bearing on his ability as a DJ. Seems like a lot of people here think DJing has something to do with money, and it really doesn’t. Miley Cyrus was one of the highest paid performers last year, while it does mean she successful in business it doesn’t mean she’s a great musician/actress.

    With that I retire from this discussion.

  • DJLp

    I think there are 2 conclusions here. Anon isn’t impressed with AM skills (his right) and some thought the MJ thread was in poor taste (another right of any individual).

    I don’t think we need to debate either. Anon has been clear on his stance & the MJ thread is gone. Our posts are usually positive & imformative. I don’t think we need to pile on anybody for any of the issues above. I think all involved get the point.

    I think those that want to give AM respect should have the remainder of this space to do it in peace (my opinion) & if you didn’t care for him, that’s ok but I don’t think this is the space or time to express that.

  • duerr

    [quote comment=”21278″]OK, the MJ thread may have been in bad taste but it was very clearly labeled “MJ JOKES”. Some people find strip clubs offensive, but the ones that walk into strip clubs that are clearly labeled and whine are well…

    [/quote]

    are you actually trying to rationalize why it’s okay to make fun of a man who was recently murdered. many of us found it offensive and insulting and fyi that goes against the forum’s rules. so maybe next time keep it to your poker game with the other muts.

  • Travis

    DJ AM achieved a lot more in his short life span then a lot of people ever will. Props for his hard work and contributions to the community. Though I’m not inclined to have much pity or empathy for his situation. I’m a firm believer in “we all get whats coming to us”. You reap what you sow folks, and believe me, I’m far from perfect!

    The guy had a good thing and f’ckd it all off by doing too many drugs. Maybe he loved the music, but its clear he loved the drugs more.

  • Anonymous

    [quote comment=””][quote comment=””]To Aon:

    Hating and jeaously never gets you far away in life. DJ Am not only was one of the best commercially, but was a well respected DJ around the community not only for his skills but putting the work and effort that most Dj’s out there aren’t willing to do. He played for C list celebrities? It seems to me not only you have no knowledge of him and you are just bitter at the fact that he worked so hard not only to be the most recognizable name in Djing, he hangout with stars like P. DIddy, Cameron Diaz and was is stage with none other than Jay-Z. Are you mad at the fact that you can’t put the work that he did? Or are you jealous at the fact that you don’t have what it takes to get there? Not only he has influence me to Dj, but also a generation that is hungry to take it to a higher level than AM. I have met other Dj’s that have been doing it for 15 or 20 years and they will gladly laugh at you’re stupidity and the fact that you’re jealousy is obvious.

    R.I.P

    To AM.

    Not only have you been an influence to me but others too.[/quote]

    That’s better.[/quote]

    I am not hating nor jealous. I just give credit where credit is do. Sorry but I was not impressed by the way he spun. I just think since his passing people have been giving him more credit then he actual deserves. Don’t get me wrong it is also sad when someone passses away that is part of the musical community.

  • Bigbarcelona23

    [quote comment=””]To Aon:

    Hating and jeaously never gets you far away in life. DJ Am not only was one of the best commercially, but was a well respected DJ around the community not only for his skills but putting the work and effort that most Dj’s out there aren’t willing to do. He played for C list celebrities? It seems to me not only you have no knowledge of him and you are just bitter at the fact that he worked so hard not only to be the most recognizable name in Djing, he hangout with stars like P. DIddy, Cameron Diaz and was is stage with none other than Jay-Z. Are you mad at the fact that you can’t put the work that he did? Or are you jealous at the fact that you don’t have what it takes to get there? Not only he has influence me to Dj, but also a generation that is hungry to take it to a higher level than AM. I have met other Dj’s that have been doing it for 15 or 20 years and they will gladly laugh at you’re stupidity and the fact that you’re jealousy is obvious.

    R.I.P

    To AM.

    Not only have you been an influence to me but others too.[/quote]

    That’s better.

  • Ken

    OK, the MJ thread may have been in bad taste but it was very clearly labeled “MJ JOKES”. Some people find strip clubs offensive, but the ones that walk into strip clubs that are clearly labeled and whine are well…

    Back on track Ean you hit a lot of points home about AM, sounded like a great guy and the DJ world collectively lost a great person.

  • Dj AM

    To Aon:

    Hating and jeaously never gets you far away in life. DJ Am not only was one of the best commercially, but was a well respected DJ around the community not only for his skills but putting the work and effort that most Dj’s out there aren’t willing to do. He played for C list celebrities? It seems to me not only you have no knowledge of him and you are just bitter at the fact that he worked so hard not only to be the most recognizable name in Djing, he hangout with stars like P. DIddy, Cameron Diaz and was is stage with none other than Jay-Z. Are you mad at the fact that you can’t put the work that he did? Or are you jealous at the fact that you don’t have what it takes to get there? Not only he has influence me to Dj, but also a generation that is hungry to take it to a higher level than AM. I have met other Dj’s that have been doing it for 15 or 20 years and they will gladly laugh at you’re stupidity and the fact that you’re jealousy is obvious.

    R.I.P

    To AM.

    Not only have you been an influence to me but others too.

  • Anonymous

    My question to all of you is did anyone know who DJ AM was before he started dating Nicole Richie? Would have he gotten the recognition he did if he never dated her.

  • Anonymous

    Sorry this is Dj Fitty. But Thanks thats been sour with me ever since it was up. Sorry for taking away from DJ AM by posting that here. I only started watching him on youtube in the past 4 or 5 months and the energy that he built up in his sets just amazed me. true there is a lot of dj that can scratch and beat match but its that level of energy that dj’s like DJ AM emits through out the dance floor and clubs that separate them and make them stars.

    again thanks ean and also for standing up for your friend and fellow dj.
    dj fitty

  • Ean Golden

    This is the first I have heard or seen that thread. If there are things that bother you like that, anyone is welcome to shoot me a personal email and we will address it. Again, its very hard to keep track of everything that happens on the site and work 14 hours a day. I agree with you- that post was not in the best taste and it has been removed.

    please post further comments with your name included so we all know who we are talking to here. It avoids confusion.

  • duerr

    i agree that mj jokes thread was wack. it’s the epitome of bad taste and i found it really offensive and disconcerting that the mods didn’t delete it. but that doesn’t validate your posts on this article Anon, i think your grasping at straws by deflecting the focus off yourself by bringing up a completely seperate instance.

  • Anonymous

    Yes then the Forum and it was very upsetting and your administrators were like oh well. at the same time this was the only dj related site that showed so much distaste at M.J. death and let it ride. So there should be no censorship at dj am death? I think you did the right thing, fellow dj’s should have a time to mourn but the wrong thing was done at M.J. death. but hey this is your site not mine.

  • Ean Golden

    [quote comment=””]AT ean. You will not tolerate bad talk about dj am but you let the M.J. jokes stand…. and made people like myself not wanting to be an active member to this site….. I’d say your are getting a taste of how it feels when people voice their negative comments about someone that has touched your life and is apart of the music industry.[/quote]

    There has never been any MJ threads on the blog. If your referring to something on the forum then please email the forum administrators as it is their job to keep things like that in check. Unfortunately its physically impossible for me to manage the blog and store plus keep track of everything on the forum.

  • Anonymous

    AT ean. You will not tolerate bad talk about dj am but you let the M.J. jokes stand…. and made people like myself not wanting to be an active member to this site….. I’d say your are getting a taste of how it feels when people voice their negative comments about someone that has touched your life and is apart of the music industry.

  • DJLp

    Oh…and if you’re wondering why my numbers were so large, I started DJing in clubs when I was 17…I’m 38 now. 21 years & proud. Mixing since day one. In comparison, Jazzy Jeff is 43…another 10k per appearance DJ (and a GOOD friend of AM’s). So before you begin to psychoanalyze any age envy, don’t get it twisted. Age & experience has a place in all of this too.

    AM was 36.

  • DJLp

    Jeez anon,

    I think you’re missng an even bigger point (and as always, I say this with rspect because everyone has a right to their opinion). As some have said, our praise of AM is not to say he was the best. HOWEVER, “best” goes beyond any one category.

    I can’t & won’t speak for you but if I can make the same money as AM did for playing crappy pop songs to C-list celebrities and hollywood hipsters…sign me up! And no, it’s not all about money as I said in my earlier post. However, I doubt any DJ on this site spins for free.

    Anyone? Hello? That’s what I thought.

    So for starters, making A MINIMUM of 10k per 2 hour appearance for playing crappy pop songs to C-list celebrities and hollywood hipsters is an accomplishment in of itself. Why? This is a business. For most, it’s also a business that’s a hobby and that brings me to that larger point.

    The digital DJ age is a gift and a curse all @ the same time. For the DJ’s that started 15, 20 & 30 years ago, the digital age is a blessing. No more trunks full of back breaking crates, hand organizing records, shopping @ flea makets, garage sales, record shows & mom & pops to find those rare 12″, etc. However, the history of DJing as a business has ALWAYS been underated by most of the people that cut the checks. That’s a story within itself. Now zip back to the digital age. Now every 22 year old with an iPod & a laptop can now promote themselves as a DJ & get gigs. Now on one side, I’m not mad @ that because who doesn’t have the right to make money? But when Mr. or Mrs. 15, 20 or 30 years experience comes along (or even a 2 or 3 year DJ), that experience means nothing because iPod boy will spin for 1/4 of your fee. After all, he’s got the records you’ve got. What makes us special?

    So keep this in mind. If you feel AM did nothing else (and you have a right to that if you so choose), he again proved that the DJ matters. No he’s not the only one that provided the proof and art is in the ear of the beholder so best or not the best is a personal decision; but numbers don’t lie. If you’re packing stadiums or comanding between 10k & 50k per gig & getting it…can anybody not argue that he apparently did something right?

    For every other category…who can scratch the best? How cool was that last set? Can you rock any crowd in front of you? We can slide opinions about that all day with no winner. At the end of the day, AM reperesented the business of DJing well (dare I day ONE of the best) & apparently through the reports of others was a nice guy at the same time.

    Anon…don’t overlook the big picture. If the iPod guys take over, we’ll all be lucky to make $100 per gig regardlss of how much better your pop songs are for A-list celebrities and hollywood mega-stars may be. That’s not to throw your words back at you, it’s just to make the larger point about how serious it is that we preserve the importance of “the business” of DJing.

    I type this to you as your brother in music & I sincerely hope no offense is taken.

  • celtic-dj

    great article,
    although i never heard of dj-AM…
    its good to know that many dj in the u.s are laptop dj’s,

    i beleive laptop dj’s or digtial dj’s are doing a precious job bringing the future of sound manipulating to the present…
    THANKS to ean and his crew even more poeple are daring to touch the future of live sound manipulating…

    the dj booth is slowly looking like a ‘space ships cockpit’…lol
    the dj is the pilot and the crowd are his passeneger’s….

    would you fly a space ship where the pilot is on drugs ?????

    just a thought…

    respect to DJ-AM.

    celtic dj

  • duerr

    ^holy typos. *deceased dj…

  • duerr

    lol @anon… way to read way to deeply into what was obviously a kind tribute to another brother in the game. Also, to question Ean’s integrity is the ultimate foot in the mouth. This blog/forum is one of a kind and I’m sure you appreciate it when you’re ego isn’t threatened by articles written to salute a contributor to digital djing (DJ AM) who may not live up to your idealistic vision of what an article worthy diseased DJ may be.

  • JesC

    Sucks that Mr AM passed away and that drugs could have taken part in his passing. My respect goes out to him as a Digi-DJ. The guy knew what to play and had mad skills.

  • Ean Golden

    @ Anon:

    Your comments were deleted because I don’t want to start a flame war in this post and you called me a “fan boy” which is just plain ignorant and dis-respectful. This is a site which I built from nothing out of love for my craft and to share my knowledge with others. If you want to contribute constructively then I will welcome you with open arms. If not, find another place to hang your dj hat.

    In terms of AM’s Talent and passion for music. What do you actually know about the man besides the tabloids? Did you hang out with him, did you watch him spin? I spent a lot of time in the booth watching his methods and they are very hard to pull off. Gaining the kind of success he did requires a lot more than just skill. It also requires luck, timing, connections, brains, planning and perseverance.

    Read the other comments and you will see that he has inspired djs and was doing great things long before he ever became well known in the press.

    Yes, there are many, many djs out that are under-paid and under-appreciated. Email me their information and we will write about them too. We feature one dj each month.

  • anon

    sorry for misspelling your name.

  • anon

    [quote comment=”21246″]
    Normally I allow people to have their say in here but this post is about a personal friend with ties to dj techtools and I will not tolerate anyone turning it into a hateful rampage. Any and all comments that that will de-rail what was a positive discussion have been and will continue to be deleted.[/quote]

    Ouch, censorship is harsh. I was actually in the process of writing you an email praising your willingness to reply to my criticism openly and cogently… oh well.

    Anyway, I’ve noticed an interesting thing. Initially, I thought that the praise for DJ AM just reflected naivete. But as I re-read your post I see it more reflects a wanting-ness. That is to say, you seem to want to praise DJ AM for contributing to the craft of DJing, when even you admit he wasn’t particularly creative or groundbreaking. It seems to me an expression of the core insecurity that afflicts many “digital” DJs. Almost as if you take an effort to legitimize DJ AM so as to legitimize yourself (and perhaps more importantly: your audience) by association.
    While I can understand and sympathize with that, I do feel that you’ve taken the wrong approach. Is it not better to praise the artists that work tirelessly in relative obscurity and produce great works than to praise the mediocre well marketed? I suppose it comes down to the primary question: Why do you do this? Are you a DJ for the love of music and expression or are you just trying to make a living and a name? While there is nothing wrong with trying to make a living, it’s worthwhile to investigate your motivations. A lot of people seem to be under the impression that being a DJ is being a 21st century rockstar. Over the many many years I’ve stood behind the decks (be they 1200s or my laptop) I’ve been asked how to become a DJ countless times. The first part of the answer is always the same: Don’t do it unless you love playing music; sex, drugs, money or fame doesn’t matter. IMNSHO, the people who need to be recognized are the ones keep that in mind and push forward because they have a passion for it.

    I write this, Eon, assuming that you’ll delete this comment as well, but my question still stands. I know that at least you will read it.

    anyway, don’t feed the trolls.

  • dj stylus

    dj am was a down to earth humble human being..
    he was also a fierce dj and expert technition.
    to command such large dj fees and grace such large crowds he was also at the top of his game as a busniessman..
    i was lucky to have known him and he will have an everlasting major impact on me as a human being, as a creative person and as a dj.

  • Ean Golden

    [quote comment=”21244″][quote comment=”21237″][quote comment=””]
    nothing to see here, move along.[/quote]
    You miss the point: He made a great contribution
    to the craft………Don’t be a hater Dawg![/quote]

    You missed the point: no, he didn’t. He played crappy pop songs to C-list celebrities and hollywood hipsters. There are plenty of amazing djs out there who actually have contributed to the art. DJ AM just wasn’t one of them.[/quote]

    I am sorry Anon, but you are missing the point of my article. Was Adam the most groundbreaking dj in the world? no. Was he in the top 10 most creative djs in the world- probably not. he did do a lot for the industry of djing both through his name, exposure and hard work.

    Normally I allow people to have their say in here but this post is about a personal friend with ties to dj techtools and I will not tolerate anyone turning it into a hateful rampage. Any and all comments that that will de-rail what was a positive discussion have been and will continue to be deleted.

  • Mark

    [quote comment=””][quote comment=”21237″][quote comment=””]
    nothing to see here, move along.[/quote]
    You miss the point: He made a great contribution
    to the craft………Don’t be a hater Dawg![/quote]

    You missed the point: no, he didn’t. He played crappy pop songs to C-list celebrities and hollywood hipsters. There are plenty of amazing djs out there who actually have contributed to the art. DJ AM just wasn’t one of them.[/quote]

    Want to listen to dj am mixes go here.http://djbigmark.podOmatic.com/

  • anon

    [quote comment=”21237″][quote comment=””]
    nothing to see here, move along.[/quote]
    You miss the point: He made a great contribution
    to the craft………Don’t be a hater Dawg![/quote]

    You missed the point: no, he didn’t. He played crappy pop songs to C-list celebrities and hollywood hipsters. There are plenty of amazing djs out there who actually have contributed to the art. DJ AM just wasn’t one of them.

  • BodegaBrad

    [quote comment=””][quote comment=”21227″]
    [quote comment=”21241″][quote comment=””] This weekend when you’re home with no gigs thinking of how you can “make it”, re-read the article.[/quote][/quote]

    Lolz, amen to that. RESTECP FOR DJ AM. Sorry to not have known his potential and influence on the game.
    Haters, please pass on quietly.[/quote]

    Thought you’d like that one Tekki…forgot to add my name to my comment, so it looks like it got bumped. Sorry.

  • Ean Golden

    [quote comment=”21227″]Hey Ean,

    Maybe a good but sensitive topic would DJs (esp. superstar DJs) and drug use and the effects it has on the industry. I had also heard a few months ago about Eric Morillo being arrested for cocaine posession at an airport. Just a suggestion.[/quote]

    Good suggestion, thats is very sensitive topic but probably a worthy one. Its hard to take an official line on it as using drugs is a very personal choice but it would be great to have a few well known people tell their personal stories on the subject.

  • tekki

    [quote comment=””] This weekend when you’re home with no gigs thinking of how you can “make it”, re-read the article.[/quote][/quote]

    Lolz, amen to that. RESTECP FOR DJ AM. Sorry to not have known his potential and influence on the game.
    Haters, please pass on quietly.

  • me dj

    [quote comment=””]
    nothing to see here, move along.[/quote]
    You miss the point: He made a great contribution
    to the craft………Don’t be a hater Dawg!

  • DJ Phaidon

    [quote comment=””]Hey Ean,

    Maybe a good but sensitive topic would DJs (esp. superstar DJs) and drug use and the effects it has on the industry. I had also heard a few months ago about Eric Morillo being arrested for cocaine posession at an airport. Just a suggestion.[/quote]

    Don’t think it’s just a DJ industry problem. Any industry has it’s drug issues at the highest levels. So you might as well say Superstar (insert industry here) drug use.

  • DJ Tony OKay

    Hey Ean,

    Maybe a good but sensitive topic would DJs (esp. superstar DJs) and drug use and the effects it has on the industry. I had also heard a few months ago about Eric Morillo being arrested for cocaine posession at an airport. Just a suggestion.

  • DJLp

    I agree. Adam (AM) was often undercredited (usually by jealous DJ’s…not his huge group of worldwide fans). Sure, plenty of guys can scratch and make Serto do some cool stuff. Adam really made an art out of taking different genres of music & making them one. If he was a so-called “unknown DJ” & I heard a set, I would still have to go…wow, nice! It’s not about who else could do it…it’s that he did it, did it on a regular basis, and constantly reconfirmed that the DJ matters.

    I hope other DJ’s understand the bigger picture about his legacy. There’s a lot of triumph & tragedy in his story. Much like media mogul Tyler Perry (google it if you don’t know), Tyler was once homeless, family problems and the whole 9. Now, all he has to do is put his name on something and it’s a maga-hit. Some say “I could’ve done that” or “that wasn’t that funny.” But consider this, when you can buy Oprah & her best friend Gail twin Bently’s becasue they loved the one you drive…doesn’t he deserve credit for figuring it all out? AM falls in the same category. And no, it’s not about him learning how to be rich. As we all can see, rich it isn’t always what it’s made out to be. But you ALWAYS have to give credit to those that figured out the formula and AM did that despite major challenges & should serve as an inspiration to those that dream that same dream. Adam IS proof that it can be done!

    He was truly 1 of the well-known greats & he will be missed.

  • Priscilla

    AMEN!

    Adam was amazing. I had the pleasure to see him work his magic in a very small venue in LA.

    The man was a machine. Graceful but gritty. The camera on my iphone couldn’t keep up with his speed. I find it odd how some people say well he was cool but any good DJ can do what he does. It reminds me of Marcel Duchamp. Anyone could do what he did with his art, but it was him who devoted his being to art and creating simple yet thought provoking art. The same applies to Adam.

    It’s nice to read an article that gives him a better title than CELEBRITY DISC JOCKEY. He was much more.

    Great article Ean.

    Rest in Peace Adam, you will be missed in LA.