Using Dynamic EQ On A 303 Synth: Luca Pretolesi

Luca Pretolesi is back with yet another tutorial for the DJTT production crowd, this time unveiling a super quick studio mixing tip that is sure to make bass lines pop out of your productions a bit more. In today’s video, learn how he uses dynamic EQ to make it happen, with one of his projects from Dada Life as a poignant example. Click through to watch the tutorial now:

Using Dynamic EQ on a 303 Synth

Luca’s tip here is pretty simple – using just a bit of compression and a dynamic EQ to make a synth go from flat/boring to a standout element in a track. Wondering what he’s using? The dynamic EQ plugin used is from MeldaProduction, called MAUTODYNAMICEQ, which runs about $106. The saturation plugin is UAD’s Thermionic Culture Vulture, available on UAD’s site for $299.

Take A Class With Luca

In addition to this video and contributing to DJ Techtools, Luca’s Studio DMI is putting on a workshop later this month that covers advanced mixing techniques. Here’s the details from them:

November 20th, 21st, 22nd at 9:00AM-2:00PM we are hosting our last Pro/Advanced Mix workshop of the year with Luca Pretolesi.

    • Featuring music from Action Music (Mixing/Mastering), Cedric Gervais (Vocal Mixing), and Dada Life (Stem Mastering).
    • For the first time we’re combining both the Pro-mix and Advanced Mix workshops
    • This workshop is NOT necessary to adjust your schedule for the specific time the workshop is being held as you’ll have at least 7 days after the workshop to review the material
    • We accept and respond to questions submitted in an 7 day period by any attendee that was not able to sit in on the live workshop or Q&A
    • A second Q&A will be held where we address questions submitted by the students who were unable to attend the live workshop to fill in any missing pieces
    • If you get a friend to sign up from Nov. 1st to the 18th by using the last 4 digits of your Black Card, you as an Ally get 50% off the Advanced Workshop.

Both Pro-Mix (In-person) /Advanced Workshop (Online)

In this course, students explore advanced application of digital audio theory and the lifestyle approach believed to best assist in quality mixing and mastering. Students will interact with audio files, DSP, software signal routing, and interfacing equipment. Topics include analog -to- digital/digital-to-analogue conversion, client relationships, treatment of sounds, and most importantly: the subjective mixing and mastering approach used by renowned audio engineer Luca Pretolesi.

Advanced Workshop: 

This live interactive online workshop will cover advanced mixing and mastering of electronic music as only Luca Pretolesi’s Studio DMI concept could instruct. Musicians and engineers who want to learn the exact mix strategies used on many of the world’s largest club singles can join along with Luca from the comfort of their own home or studio. During the 3-day workshop, “innovators” will sit in their own sweet spot and follow along as we dissect an electronic music mix from a professional producer.

To sign up for a seat, apply here: https://studiodmi.com/studio-dmi-edu/

Want to watch more production content on DJTT? Check out the below playlist:

303Compressiondada lifedynamic eqLuca Pretolesimixingprocessingstudio dmisynthsynthesizer
Comments (10)
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  • CazCoronel

    Great tip thank you 🙂

  • calgarc

    those Luca Pretolesi videos are amazing 🙂

  • sinesthetix

    Holy crap that desk is awesome.

  • qazen

    Hmm, this is more than just mixing imho. This is polishing and altering the original quite a bit. But maybe this is just, what modern artists are getting used to. Getting it done for them.

    • 11Fletcher

      This is the engineer job. Track mixed by the composer is a really new thing, but it’s not how it supposed to be done, and the engineer is not here just to make it sound good and clean, but also to give a color to the sound, to add some characters. That’s what makes a good engineer oposite to a guy that just do the minimum.

      Sure the producer could have done this by themself, but that’s why having an engineer is important, because it give another point of view. Music always worked like that. If you take Nirvana’s album and make them recorded or mixed by other engineer they would sound really different. That doesn’t mean the band didn’t did his job. Same goes with electronic producer.

      Being his own engineer it’s just because it’s less expensive, but that doesn’t mean it’s a more “real” or “true” way to do.

      • qazen

        I agree