Review: Four Great Budget Microphones for DJs

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The humble microphone—not the most glamorous piece of gear, but, for many DJs, it’s an essential tool that shouldn’t be overlooked. Not everyone uses, or needs to own, a mic. Here in the UK, using a mic as a DJ is kind of frowned upon in many circles. Where I live, in Newcastle, it’s typically relegated to the kind of bars and clubs that are chock-full of bachelorette parties and people in matching costumes throwing up on each other. That’s started to change a little in recent times, though. As more DJs see their EDM heroes jumping on the mic to hype up a crowd at massive events, the stigma attached to it has begun to dissipate, with ‘cool’ club and bar DJs more open to using a mic than they once were.

Of course, DJs in other fields have been rocking the mic quite happily forever; my impression from across the pond is that club DJs in the States are far better versed in using a mic to hype a crowd, and of course, I don’t need to even discuss how important mic usage is for mobile DJs.

As such, I’ve taken a close look at four microphones, strictly with DJ use in mind. Here are the specs I decided to focus on:

Wired: Wireless is great, but it has its downsides for DJing. A high-quality system can be very expensive, and will take up a lot of space in your bag if you have to carry it around. There’s also the consideration that in many venues, a spare XLR cable will be easy to find; a spare wireless transmitter, not so much. If you’re wandering around a massive stage, you might need wireless, but I’ve stuck to wired mics for this review.

Under $100: I suspected that spending over $100 on a DJ mic isn’t really necessary, and I’m happy to have found that my tests have supported this. All the mics tested here are absolutely usable for DJing, and I’m convinced that any extra money you could spend is redundant, unless you intend to use the mic for other purposes, too.

Dynamic: These are mics that need to take abuse, so dynamic is the way to go. There’s also no power required (batteries or phantom power). Condenser mics are great for the studio, but not so good for use on stage.

cardioid

Cardioid pattern: By the time those other stipulations have been met, cardioid or super-cardioid pattern mics are the only options in the running. I’ll refer you to WikiPedia for more details about patterns, but to summarize, a cardioid pattern picks up sound from your mouth, and rejects sound from the rear, reducing feedback and unwanted noise. An omnidirectional pattern would not give you good results in the club.

Switched: Producers and live sound engineers will turn their noses up at mics with on-off switches; after all, you don’t need a switch if there’s a sound guy ready to hit the mute button on his big desk. But for DJ use, I prefer a switch—you don’t have to use it, but I find when using a mic handheld, it’s usually easier to control with the mic itself, rather than constantly reaching for a small button on your mixer.

Metal-bodied: Any plastic mic is straight out the window. A mic for DJing needs a solid metal body to cut down on handling noise—the noise made as you move your hand around on it the body. In the video, I simulate that rather excessively by tapping the mics, which is obviously a no-no, but it gives you an idea of how the different bodies deal with movement and vibration.

 djmic1

NOTE: WHERE’S THE SM58?

I’m sure that some readers might suggest that a comparison review of dynamic mics that doesn’t feature the Shure SM58 (which runs right around $100), is as flawed as a headphone roundup with no Sennheiser HD-25s. However, we decided on sticking to four mics, in order to cover each well enough, and I don’t think there’s much new to say about a mic which has been on the market for 40 years. I’ve used an SM58 many times, and it’s a great mic, deserving of its reputation. But we wanted to check out some more recent gear here.

NUMARK WM200 ($30)numark

I approached the WM200 with a degree of skepticism. Could a $30 mic possibly be up to the job? Amazingly, yes, it is. For sure, the WM200 is easily the lightest mic in the test, and the amount of handling noise evident is much higher, as that light weight would lead you to suspect. But the build quality is decent enough, with my only qualm being the small little red on/off switch, which feels a bit more exposed and breakable than the inset switches on the AKG and Audio-Technica models. The switch also seems a little more noisy than the others, but that could just be a byproduct of the handling noise.

The sound quality is perfectly acceptable for DJing—it sounded just fine in the club and in my studio test. Numark doesn’t provide specs for it, but the sensitivity appears to be quite high, so you don’t need a lot of added gain with the WM200. That does mean a little more care needs to be taken to avoid feedback, though.

You get a lot for your $30, too: A hard plastic foam-lined case houses the WM200, a wall mount (weird), and an unbalanced XLR-jack cable. If $30 is the absolute most you can spend on a mic, or you want something to keep in your bag for emergencies, then you can’t really go wrong with the WM200. It streets ahead of the plastic junk you’ll find for at Radio Shack for $20, and held its own very well against the more expensive competition here.

SENNHEISER E840 ($130)

senn

The current model in Sennheiser’s range that fits our criteria for this review is the E835S; street price around $100, has an onboard switch. Unfortunately, Sennheiser UK didn’t have a review unit to send me, so I got the E840 instead. And it’s a very good microphone. Heavy, solid construction, not too much in the way of handling noise; the super-cardioid pickup pattern was very good at rejecting feedback when I tried it at a venue.

Check out the video for an idea of how it sounds; I had no complaints there. It sounds maybe a little more dull than the other mics on test, to my ears, but clean, and clarity is good. It comes with the basic accessories, a pencil-case-type zip-up bag, and an adaptor clip for use with a stand.

In terms of differences compared to the E835S, there’s no switch, so I can’t comment on how silent (or noisy) that is, and the model tested has a slightly wider frequency response in the very top end. Otherwise, Sennheiser have assured me the build and sound are the same.

The current switched version of the E840—the E845S—has a street price of around $150, so however good it is, it simply can’t be a winner in this particular test. Based on using the E840, though, I’m confident you’ll get great results with the E835S. Let us know in the comments if you’ve used one, and what you think of it.

AUDIO-TECHNICA PRO 41 ($50)

audiot

Another mic at the more budget end of the scale, the PRO 41 is pretty impressive for its street price of around $50-60. It’s not quite as heavy as the AKG or the Sennheiser, but more reassuringly weighty than the Numark, the build quality feels very good for the money.

The MagnaLock on/off switch is inset, with a nice action, albeit not completely silent. Sound-wise, handling noise is present, but not excessive, and the cardioid (as opposed to super-cardioid) pattern seemed to make very little difference in my live tests, or in the lab. It has a nice bright sound, which I found worked well for my voice when trying to cut through loud music.

In the box you get a stand clip, a pencil case, and a 15-foot XLR-XLR cable—a lot of value for your 50 bucks.

I almost feel bad, because I don’t really have much more to say about the PRO 41. It’s a solid, well-made, good-value mic with decent sound quality. Like a mid-range saloon car, it’s doesn’t get my heart pounding, but it does the job at hand (no pun intended) very well indeed. Audio-Technica have a massive range of mics, from the super-cheap to the crazy expensive, and no doubt there are other products in their range which will have mic fetishists foaming at the mouth, but for $50, the PRO 41 is a great choice for a DJ looking for a mic that will take some abuse and not break the bank.

AKG D5S ($95)

akg

At the top end of our $100 price limit sits the D5S. There’s no cable in the box with this one, but you do get the usual clip and pouch, plus a sticker. (I like stickers. All manufacturers should put stickers in with everything, in my opinion.)

Visually, it’s very striking, with the angular shape of the body and capsule, and the silver color accents. That sharp, sudden tapering of the body not only looks good, it feels great, too, almost offering a little physical reminder to keep your grip away from the capsule, as you should, rather than clutching it like a bad drum & bass MC after a few too many cans of Red Stripe.

Sound quality with mics is always subjective, as everyone’s voice is different, but I found the D5S most pleasing to my ears of all the mics I tested. It’s a super-cardioid pattern, and seemed pretty good at avoiding feedback, too.

The inset on/off switch has a slightly shorter throw than the one on the PRO 41, and feels a little more ‘clicky.’ It does exhibit a small amount of noise when switched, but like the Audio-Technica, it’s nothing that will cause you issues in a live setting. The same goes for handling noise, which is about equal to the Sennheiser; not noticeable unless you something dumb, like tapping it (as I do in the video review).

There’s just something about the feel, and the balance, of the D5S that just appealed to me. Ergonomics and design go a long way with fairly simple products like mics, and thankfully the D5S has the audio chops to prove it’s not just a pretty face.

WRAP-UP

Aoki - Mic

As I stated earlier, the Sennheiser E840 can’t be the winner of this round-up; I suspect the E835S might have been a strong contender, but without getting my hands on it, I can’t recommend it outright. I can suggest that you check out the Sennheiser range, though, as the E840 I tested is indeed an impressive bit of gear.

Of the other three, my winner has to be the AKG D5S. That might seem to be a given, as it’s three times the price of the WM200, and double that of the PRO 41, but what surprised me was just how good those cheaper options turned out to be. The AKG feels, sounds, and looks like every cent of its $100 price tag, but the Audio-Technica and Numark models will do a good job for any DJ, too.

Now, this was not a long-term test; I have used and abused these mics, but only for a short period of time. Seeing as there’s very little technological difference between this group of quite similar mics, it’s worth understanding that when you pay a bit more, you’re paying for build quality above all else. So unless you’re only a very occasional mic user, it’s probably worth reaching as close to that $100 threshold as you can, because $100 will get you a very nice mic indeed.

But if you can’t, don’t sweat it. I used the WM200 at one gig, the PRO 41 at another, and the AKG at the next, and I’m pretty sure I was the only person in the room who noticed any difference, and that’s because I was holding them.

Have you used any of these microphones for DJing, or are there others out there that you think the DJTT community should consider? Let us know in the comments!

  • Wormtongue
  • Tomas

    The Sennheiser e840 review is completely useless.. it has been done with almost no imformation about the actual product. First of all, the e840 has a cardiod pickup pattern (NOT a super-cardiod) and thats an important spec, people could read this review and buy a mic that is not what they are looking for. The funny thing is that the writter of this review says that he noticed the supercardiod pickup pattern when he tested it. It also says that e845s is the name of the e840 switched version. That couldnt be more wrong. The e845s is a totally different mic that has even a different pickup pattern (super-cardiod), sounds and cost different. If you want to know if it has a switch or not, look for the “s” next to the model name (Ej: e840 –> e840s) this applies to many other brands too.

    Lastly, if they wanted to give an idea of what would be the experience with an e835 (it says so) they shouldnt say anything of what they said since the only thing that applies for the e835 is maybe the dull sound (thats subjective, and up to personal likes) and the clarity that is something that all the 800’s series kind of share (the 835 has a strong kind of mid-boost though).
    Actually, all the “mistakes” i point out could be easily explained if the writter confused the name of the mic and he was actually using an e845 istead of a e840.
    I had no intention but helping people make a better choice on what mic to buy.
    I apologise for my bad english and hope you understood everything. Greetings from Argentina :D.

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  • Beyerdynamic TG V35d s

    Great performance!

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  • Arnau Naw

    I would go for an hipercardioid pattern instead of a cardioid. Because rejection is at 120 degrees instead of 180, which points more directively to the monitors booth. Which usually are at the right and left of the booth.

    • Arnau Naw

      Shure Beta58, or the cheaper akg p5, might be good examples.

  • Spook, The

    Sennheiser – never liked them. They often sound like tin cans and I’ve had a few break down.

    AT – one can do better, but their rep has come up in the world. Get an SM 57 or 58 (Protip: in the 90s the Shure was subcontracted to do the Radio Shack house brand, which were SM-57s under the grill).

    Numark’s is in the microphone game? Skip it. A mic should help you sound awesome. Don’t go cheap or buy a used real mic for the same price. I’ve found beaten old EVs and AKGs for the same price that’ll outlast this thing and sound AWESOME.

    The AKG is acceptable, but I’ve heard better from them (once again, shop used mics; goods ones last forever).

    I recently picked up some EV PL-44s for 50 a piece (got ’em on sale; they run 75ish new). I’m impressed with that model and use it for my mobile business (good for people who don’t know how to use a mic).

    The EV 635a is still in production, goes for 100 new and will blow every mic in this article away. Substitute one of these for a hammer, build house with it and it’ll STILL sound awesome in 30 years. The 635a was built for field reporters and doesn’t get much “handling noise,” but the big thing is to learn how to respect and handle a mic to begin with. Don’t cup it, bump it, finger-drum it or tap the grill (is this thing on?), etc.

    Also, back to respecting your mic and system DO NOT use the on/off switch when the mic is potted up. Hear that popping sound? Nope, it’s not good for your system. Don’t be afraid to buy a mic without an on/off. You kids know how to use faders and pots.

  • DJ Rigo

    I can understand that you may have not have had anything new to say about the SM58 or SM57, but I think you fail to fully inform your audience by not demonstrated how the product deemed as the equally priced industry standard competes with the mics that you are introducing in this article/video.

    • Fuller

      I totally agree. IMO, this article should be prefaced with a message acknowledging that the SM57/SM58 (and 2-3 others) are industry standards that have been earning their reputations for longer than half the people on this board have been alive and should be the go-to pick, unless you have a specific reason to get something else (and I’d argue against including an on/off switch in the criteria…).

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • lesterhein

    I can vouch for the rock solid build quality of the Sennheiser. When I used to do setups, it was my standard mic for backing vocals, with the 57 or 58 on lead. Very smooth, not as much volume as the 58 and a little less bass response. If you can get one second hand, you won’t be disappointed

  • RØDE M1 ($100-120) beats anything. Just as, if not more, durable than an SM58. Better sounding than any other of my dynamic vocal microphones, and looks great!

    • lesterhein

      I had a couple of these and I loved the tone, but I always found that I had to push them harder than the SM58s in the mix if it was on a budget board, which often lead to pops and plosives.

      Fantastic build quality and great sound, but it deserves a good pre-amp to really make it shine.

  • Andy Taylor

    Any budget mic review needs a mention of the xm8500. So cheap, good sound and as rubust as an SM58. The only downside is no switch… Behringer http://www.studiospares.com/mics-vocalist/behringer-ultravoice-xm8500/invt/381120?source=215_74&gclid=CJzO0YvhiL4CFWzHtAod33kAfQ

    • I can’t agree man, I was mixing sound at a youth event about 6 months ago, and the singer brought his own mic (xm8500) covered in coloured tape, and I didn’t realise he was using an alternate to my Beta58s until I heard it. Usually dynamic microphones have minimal/subtle sound quality differences; however this microphone sounded horrible, all muddy lower mids, really cluttered sounding, and really hard to EQ. Once I swapped the Beta58 back he sounded great.

  • DJ Rojas

    I have a Peavey Pvi for 14 years that I really like. So when I needed a second mic, I got the Peavey PVi2. I am impressed with the quality, they both are dynamic and have metal bodies. They have very low if any handling noise. Price is about 50 bucks.

  • Toontown

    I’m also a fan of the Shure PG58. It’s the budget line for Shure, so it’s not as nice/loud as the SM58, but it’s definitely better than that Numark piece for only $20 more.

    • Jim Davis

      +1 on the PG58. I’m a mobile DJ that is on the mic a lot for weddings (bridal party intros, etc.) and it’s solid. I recently bought a BLX wireless set with the PG58 version handheld as well… $300 here in the US. Also great.

  • DJSteveLozzi

    Shure makes a few very budget friendly mic’s. I own is the PG-48, which has always served me well and feels as if it’s a $100 mic. Sound is clear, carrys through a room of people, etc. Only flaw is you have to hold it within 6 inches from your mouth as it won’t pick up your voice if its too far away, but where else would you be holding it??? It was $40, with a case & cable…can’t beat that!

  • Grandmaster George Bush

    SM58 or Beta 58A – industry standards, inexpensive but good resale value, versatile (can be used for other things – vocalists, instruments, etc.), built like tanks. I have a Sennheiser 835 S also, and although Senn makes great stuff in general, this is really not an impressive microphone from a sound quality point of view.

  • I highly recommend the Behringer XM-8500

  • calgarc

    SM57. SM57. SM57. SM57. SM57. 😀

    • Toontown

      I’ve used it a ton to mic instruments (literally every instrument you can think of) and only use it for vocals when necessary, but it’s a great mic.

      • calgarc

        ive used from everything to drums to recording vocal demos, acoustic instruments you name it 😀

    • lesterhein

      Lots of love for the 57 here too, but I found that it didn’t work very well on male lead vox. It just sounds… dead and doesn’t have the warmth of the 58. I guess the cheese word would be that it’s not as “creamy”

      Not bad on female leads. Great for backup and an absolute star on drums.

      • y001Thomas Grim

        do you honestly feel that the sm58 sounds better than the AKG D5?

        • y001Thomas Grim

          sorry, I see that this is a very old post

  • Gabriel Rodriguez

    I bought an Shure SM-48 for less than $50 and have loved it ever since. Does the job for DJ and is great quality.

  • Oddie O’Phyle

    i love my e840, it’s a solid piece for gear.

  • TheQuakerOatsGuy

    The SM-58 is $99, isn’t it? Surprised it’s not on there. Thanks for the suggestions. I’ve been looking for a good back-up mic.

    • Chris Brackley

      I did put a whole paragraph in the article talking about why the SM58 wasn’t in the review…

      It’s been around for so long; everyone knows it, and knows it’s great. This was never meant to be a comprehensive round-up of the whole market, just 4 mics out there that might be worth looking at. 😉

      • Carter Sullivan-Irwin

        I’m an audio tech first and a DJ/VJ second, and the SM-58 is the ONLY budget mic I recommend to people. Its super durable, has a good frequency range, and provides a quality sound for the price. I understand its been around forever, but there is a reason its the standard for budget mics in the industry for so long.

        • TheQuakerOatsGuy

          Dang. I, sir, am a genius. Sorry about that. Great article, by the way.

  • PJ Villaflor

    I personally prefer an Audix OM2 for these reasons. It’s $99; it sounds
    comparable to an SM58 with maybe a bit more gain; its hyper-cardioid
    which rejects more feedback than the SM58, more comparable to the
    Beta58; and the head is a built in shock mount that is designed to
    bounce when dropped making it more durable than most microphones in it’s
    price range. I’m surprised it’s not on the list.

    • Chris Brackley

      That Audix certainly looks good.

      For this review, the mics I sourced were based on suggestions from retailers and DJs that I know, and Audix never came up. Perhaps they aren’t so big here in the UK.

      If we look at mics again in the future, I’ll be sure to check out their range.